about our local supporters, and national partners...

 
 

American Cancer Society

 
 

The American Cancer Society was founded in 1913 by 10 doctors and 5 laypeople in New York City. It was called the American Society for the Control of Cancer (ASCC). At that time, a cancer diagnosis meant near certain death. Rarely mentioned in public, this disease was steeped in fear and denial. Doctors sometimes did not tell their patients they had cancer, and patients often did not tell their friends and families that they had been diagnosed with it.

The Society’s founders knew they had to raise public awareness about cancer if progress was to be made against this disease. Despite the enormity of their task, our founders and their colleagues set about writing articles for popular magazines and professional journals; publishing Campaign Notes, a monthly bulletin of cancer information; and recruiting doctors throughout the country to help educate the public.

 

www.cancer.org

 

It was in these early years that the Society first used its now-iconic Sword of Hope symbol, which today is part of the organization’s logo. The sword came from a 1928 nationwide poster contest sponsored by the ASCC and the New York City Cancer Committee. George E. Durant of Brooklyn won the contest, receiving a first prize of $500. He selected the sword to express the crusading spirit of the cancer control movement. The twin-serpent caduceus, which forms the handle of the sword, emphasizes the medical and scientific nature of the Society’s work. Classically, twined serpents represent healing of the sick and creativity of the healthy.

Over the past 100 years, the logo has changed many times. The current American Cancer Society logo presents a contemporary, powerful, and cohesive entity. The trapezoidal shape with the angled edge suggests forward movement, aspiration, and growth. The overall design creates the image of a flag being carried forth toward victory. This symbol is intended to unite people in the common goal to save lives from cancer.

“We're headed in the right direction.  We just need to keep driving.”

— Ayile' Arnett (earlier today)

 
 
 

AVON Breast Cancer Crusade

 
 

The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, which launched in 1992, has placed Avon and the Avon Foundation for Women at the forefront of the fight against breast cancer. Over the last 25 years, with the support of Avon’s six million independent Avon Representatives worldwide, Avon Walkers, and Avon employees and customers, Avon and the Avon Foundation for Women have donated more than $800 million to breast cancer causes, educated 180 million women about this disease, and funded breast health screenings for nearly 20 million women.

We’re proud of what we have done. But we know there is much more to do. And we know we can’t do it alone. We are committed to working in partnership every step of the way with charities and breast cancer experts.

 

www.avonfoundation.org

 

 

And we won’t stop until every woman knows the risks, knows the signs, and knows how and when to take action to protect her breast health.

Early detection of breast cancer saves lives. At Avon, we believe that no woman should die because she was left in the dark about breast cancer. Yet too many women still aren’t aware of their risks, and don’t know what signs to look for, or what to do and where to go if they have concerns.

In 2017, Avon conducted a global survey of 19,000 Avon Representatives in 15 countries on their knowledge of breast cancer risks and signs. The findings show there is a knowledge gap amongst women globally about what the symptoms are for breast cancer and how to lower the risk of developing the disease.

Breast health aware. Every woman. Every day.

 
 
 

Baptist Cancer Center

 
 

You shouldn't have to leave behind family, friends and the place you feel most comfortable to get the most advanced and compassionate cancer care. Because cancer affects not just the individual, but the patient's family and relatives as well, it's better to be treated and cared for in your own community surrounded by what's familiar.

www.baptistcancercenter.com

Through the BCC, Baptist Memphis offers treatment, research, support services, community education, and the area's first genetic counseling and testing program for cancer. In addition, the hospital has the Mid-South's first adult myelosuppression unit, which provides specialized care for patients who have received chemotherapy that interferes with blood cell production or stops bone marrow activity.